• #108846 I'm the OP....
    #11995· 5d ago

    #108846 I'm the OP. This is a follow-up because I sense a lot of people missed my original point. My dad would insist on sending all of us to school. There's was no saying no to him or talking things over. He is very domineering. He insisted on driving me to wherever I needed to go until I was 30. He only stopped because he got a stroke and he couldn't drive anymore. I tried explaining to my teachers that my dad was uncompromising and insisted on sending me to school. I even begged for them to call my dad but they refused because he was a big law firm senior partner and they seem to be afraid of talking to him. My dad has a reputation of being pretty disrespectful to teachers because he feels teachers, to use his words, "all think they're a big deal." To those that said I picked a school in the central area even though I live in the east, have you guys been young before? Maybe things worked a little different in your families but nobody in my family had any say until we started working. I didn't choose my secondary school, I didn't choose my JC, and when it came to it I wanted to do law (I was offered) but my dad said law is a lot of work and you can't be rich so he forced me to study computer science and mathematics. Anyway, even my nephew who is currently at kindergarten was told off for being late, even though (1) he can't even speak very well yet (2) it is obviously his parents' fault. I don't like being late. I think it is disrespectful and very "unsingaporean." Yet, punishing students when their parents are mostly responsible makes very little sense. In addition, I was sometimes late even having taken the first bus. I am always early to things now that I can drive and I have more control but I couldn't my whole life. Perhaps having being punished for being late all the time contributed to my punctuality now but having said that I could have been expelled and things could have been very different.

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  • I'm the OP of post #108872...
    #11994adviceask-prof-benrant· 5d ago

    I'm the OP of post #108872 Perhaps I must have been rather hyperbolic to claim that anything ≤S$200K PA is not liveable. But my point being is that the wages of most jobs suited for your traditional mechanical and electrical engineering graduates don't pay well. They are indeed miles apart as compared to other fields like SWE, DS, Banking & Finance. For those talking about the abundance of jobs in the semiconductor manufacturing, transport and utilities industry, I'd ask if any of you actually tried to find out what's the pay like for the jobs in these industries? Are you sure that it is engineers they need or it is technicians and operators that are needed en masses? For the jobs in semiconductor and land transport industry, the entry pay is something between 2.5K to 4K per month. Those with 5 years experience can probably only get something like 4K to 5K per month. Are such wages really that great as compared to a SWE job that can easily offer 8K to 10k per month as a starting pay? In response to the OP of post #108881, yes. I've read the book "Bullshit Jobs". If you read between the lines, bullshit jobs are pretty much bullshit only when the necessity of said jobs are perceived to be unnecessary. In a world populated by pacifists, the military is obsolete. However, if everybody's fighting against one another, the military suddenly seems important for the security of a state. Anyway, you mentioned that all "white collar" jobs are bullshit jobs? Do you have any idea that most university graduate engineers are white collar engineers after all? This is especially apparent among the engineering jobs in the govt sectors (likes of PUB, LTA, DSTA, DSO, SAF and HTX) which can offer a starting pay beyond $5K and probably hit somewhere like $6.5K after 5 years. Most graduate engineers working in the government sectors are "white collar" service engineers in nature. These jobs pay slightly better than most mechanical and electrical engineering jobs in the private sectors. However, the draconian nature of the public sector may create incessant layers of policies, leading to their "engineers" being mere bureaucrats running and maintaining the processes, ergo sounding like some sort of bullshit jobs. But if one can look past all these bullshit, perhaps the attractive place for mechanical and electrical engineering graduates is to work in the public sector. However, do we have so many jobs to go around? Those who argued that one need not work as an engineer despite studying engineering, the point of studying engineering is just to develop analytical thinking skills. I bet this statement applies to graduates of all other STEM fields. But the difference lies between the high aptitude ones who can achieve success in any field and those of lower aptitude who enrolled in a university course just because said course with a low bar of entrance is the best they can get themselves into. Do we want to delude these people into believing that they should be getting graduate level engineering jobs, when they do not necessarily have the aptitude to do one? Or should these people just make do with their polytechnic diploma and to go work as a technician? (Perhaps the A level graduates with bad grades should find other way out rather than to just enroll oneself into these cookie cutter conventional engineering courses, just to realise that you cannot survive the academic and technical rigour anyway) Furthermore, the oversupply of mechanical and electrical engineering graduates is also one of the reasons why wages are depressed, as explained earlier.

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  • Hi CS graduate of #108819. I first read...
    #11993advice· 5d ago

    Hi CS graduate of #108819. I first read your post shared on other sites of not securing a job after more than a hundred applications to software roles. It could be tempting to go for less popular roles compared to your desired field to just get a job. After reading the poor advice by others below your post, I decided to write in. Many advice including from Prof Ben centered on getting any job even if it's from a less popular field. I don't know who Prof Ben is. I have a suspicion he does not understand the job market in the private sector. My opinion is entering into less-popular fields is highly risky and may not be worth the money you get. Less popular fields are less popular for a reason. They could be sunset industries, oversupply of workers, increased outsourcing and less employer value etc. You cited testing, game dev and embedded. Testing jobs are less-valued as it's relatively low value compared to actual development. If a company needs to save money, they can fire the testers and get devs themselves to do testing. There can be devs and no testers but not testers without devs. Game dev is fundamentally a sweatshop with poor job security, driven by passion of plenty of young people. Game dev should never be a long-term career choice. Embedded has moved with the electronics industry to lower cost countries. Embedded is after all a simple low-value, low barrier of entry role anyone in developing countries can do as it's simply one C programming language running on simple hardware. Here is why advice given by other comments to take the low paying job in a less popular field can be more detrimental, 1. A low starting salary will affect your lifetime earnings. Every increment in your company through merit or promotion is based on a percent change from your existing salary. When you switch jobs, most employers will ask for your previous package and give a jump based on that. If you project this to the end of your career, you could be leaving 6 or 7 figure earnings on the table if you start of with a low package. 2. Going into a less popular field leaves you at risk of being pigeonholed into that field. As a former hiring manager, the most important information I look at a new resume are what is your previous job or internship, education level and overall years of experience. Should you subsequently decide to switch to a better field, your previous job experience will not be related and you have to start over from an entry level position or lower salary band. You could even be too senior by then to be considered. Here are my advice, 1. If you have not been getting much responses, perhaps something is off with how you wrote your CV. Have you had it proofread by someone else? 2. Do mock interviews. You mentioned you got some interviews but did not get offered. Perhaps it's your mannerisms or your tone. Mock interviews can include technical aspects. Be comfortable doing code whiteboarding and brush up your leetcode. 3. Reach out to your network to ask for referrals. A large portion of jobs today are obtained through referrals. Some jobs are not even advertised online. At the minimum, it gets your resume in front of the relevant hiring manager compared to the sea of applicants that HR or automated systems may filter away. 4. If you must take a smaller package, do it in a field that has potential to grow. When you make a job switch, at minimum you will have related experience in your current role for better negotiating leverage. 5. Have you considered applying overseas? International working experience is highly valued by employers as it signals independence, risk-taking and going out of your comfort zone. Working overseas is easiest when you are still young and have less commitments. I wish you all the best in your job search!

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  • Guys, ever thought you aren’t good enough to...
    #11992advice· 5d ago

    Guys, ever thought you aren’t good enough to deserve someone? Recently, there’s a guy chasing after me. He’s from the top uni of the world with masters, earning twice of me, brimming with positive energy. Honestly, he’s sort of a perfect guy to be with. Okay, so I thought aiya 3 months after this guy wouldn’t chase after me anyway. It’s almost 4 months and he’s asking if we could go into a relationship. Sometimes I wonder why do I deserve him. Yes he has everything I wanted but my low self esteem doubted and somehow I feel we don’t share the same interest. I prefer not to go into a relationship knowing it might not last and I have been distancing myself slightly from him. What should I do? I really think that a two person coming tgt should somehow from similar background

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  • I’m recently promoted but my colleagues have all...
    #11991advicerant· 5d ago

    I’m recently promoted but my colleagues have all turned against me. So im in my current company for 2 years now and I have taken up a lot of responsibilities and thus was given the opportunity to get promoted. I was happy of course, as I was being recognised for my hard work. However, my colleagues in the same department are all really salty about it. I’m the youngest and with the least experience, however I was the only one who got promoted. Another colleague whom joined 1 year earlier than me and is of the same role did not get promoted nor get a good pay incremental. She was really really unhappy about it and she made up a lot of stories about me and tried to bring me down. Long story short, many people believed her and now my entire department has turned against me. I have done nothing wrong and I did no one dirty. All I did was work, and perhaps too good at my job to get promoted first and someone is salty about it. Now they are making my life really difficult and they have outcasted me. Work before my promotion was manageable because of the fun environment, but now work is just a torture to me. It’s no longer fun but all politics. Is it time for me to leave the company? I enjoyed my job and I really liked my colleagues before they all turned against me. This is my first full time job and im really surprised by how politics is so influential in the company. Everyday I feel so wronged and upset. What did I even do to make them do all these to me? I feel like im burnt out already. Sigh. Adulting sucks.

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  • You're all caught up 😁